ETCHING OF STONEWALL JACKSON BASED ON A PENCIL SKETCH THAT VOLCK HURRIEDLY MADE WHILE PASSING THROUGH A CAMP DURING A BLOCKADE-RUNNING TRIP AND NOTICING JACKSON STANDING AMONG A GROUP OF OFFICERS.

[np: nd]. Small etching, 3" x 4-1/4". Full length portrait of Jackson in full uniform, facing left. Accompanied with a small typed note which identifies the piece [brittle and chipping]. The etching is Fine.

Volck described the circumstances of this engraving in a letter to McHenry Howard as follows: "The drawing from which this hasty etching was made is from life. It was on one of my blockade-running trips, not long after the second battle of Bull Run. I had crossed the Potomac above Ball's Bluff, and carrying important papers, was making my way across the country to get to a certain place, the name of which I have forgotten, but where I knew a person who would push me forward. I came quite unexpectedly upon a camp, and not meeting the pickets, I walked right through it. On the other side of the huts and shelters I saw some officers talking together, among them Jackson. As I seemed unobserved I pulled out my sketch book and made what can hardly be pronounced a striking likeness of the General. I was almost done with it when one of the officers pointed me out, and General Jackson looked around at me with a pleasant smile and turned away. . . An etching was made immediately after my return, some three or four days afterward. . . "
The engraving is accompanied by a typed note which identifies the piece. "The etching of Stonewall Jackson was made by Dr. A.J. Volck of Baltimore ... It is the only likeness of Jackson taken from life in existence and was made by Dr. Volck during the late Civil War. . . There are but three or four copies of it and Dr. Volck still has the plate. . . About a year ago, an article on Stonewall Jackson was published in Century and a copy of the etching was published by Century ... The likeness is considered perfect. ... The etching is quite valuable." The etching was reproduced as an illustration to "The Battle of Gaines's Mill", by D.H. Hill, in The Century, v. 30, no. 2 (June 1885), p. 295; [Howard: RECOLLECTIONS OF A MARYLAND CONFEDERATE SOLDIER AND STAFF OFFICER UNDER JOHNSTON, JACKSON AND LEE. Baltimore: 1914, pp.131-133.]
"The etching is reproduced in G.M. Anderson, 'The work of Adalbert Johann Volck 1828-1912' (1970), p. [53], with facing note: 'In a letter written years later to a Baltimore lady, Volck described how he took a pencil and hurriedly made a sketch of Jackson. Later he made an etching and a few copies were struck. In 1898 for the Great Confederate Bazaar in Baltimore, more were struck from the original plate and sold'" [OCLC].
"Adalbert John Volck (1828-1912) came to the United States from Germany in 1848 and eventually settled in Baltimore where he practiced dentistry. Volck was also a painter and possessed a flair for caricature. Signing his work V. Blada, Volck is known as the only Confederate cartoonist whose influence was on a par with Thomas Nast. His Confederate War Etchings and Sketches from the Civil War in North America are stinging satirical depictions of northern hypocrisy." [http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/cartoon/civil.html]
OCLC 371399383 [1-Brown Univ.] as of July 2021. Item #37673

Price: $4,500.00

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