THE NEGRO QUESTION AND THE I.O.G.T. AN HISTORICAL AND CRITICAL DISQUISITION BY WILLIAM HOYLE. Good Templars, William Hoyle.
THE NEGRO QUESTION AND THE I.O.G.T. AN HISTORICAL AND CRITICAL DISQUISITION BY WILLIAM HOYLE.

THE NEGRO QUESTION AND THE I.O.G.T. AN HISTORICAL AND CRITICAL DISQUISITION BY WILLIAM HOYLE.

London: E. Curtice & Co. [A. Ireland and Co., Printers, Manchester], [1876]. 24pp. Disbound, else Very Good.

The International Order of Good Templars, established in America "for the reclamation of drunkards," was "founded upon the principle of the universal brotherhood of man." Unfortunately, in the Southern States "the liberation of the slaves did not eradicate the feeling of prejudice and social caste which had been imbibed during the days of slavery... Good Templary is, perhaps, of all institutions, the one which comes most into conflict with ideas of caste."
White Templars in the post-Civil War Southern States initially "rejected any kind of Templar membership for black people, eventually all white jurisdictions authorized segregated black Templar societies" [Fahey, TEMPERANCE AND RACISM, pages 105 et seq. U KY Press. 1996]. The refusal of the Southern Templars to establish fellowship with blacks on a basis of equality stirred up much conflict in the world organization of Templars, with numerous occasions of dispute described in this pamphlet. The refusal of the governing board to require racially integrated chapters led to the resignation in protest of many Templars, led by Joseph Malins. The Malins adherents, says Hoyle, made the wrong decision. Each chapter of the Templars is constitutionally permitted to establish its own rules. For the greater good, the views of intransigent southerners should be accommodated.
Not in Blockson, Work, or LCP. According to OCLC, apparently not uncommon in institutional holdings. Item #37774

Price: $500.00