SOME HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF GUINEA, ITS SITUATION, PRODUCE AND THE GENERAL DISPOSITION OF ITS INHABITANTS. WITH AN INQUIRY INTO THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF THE SLAVE TRADE, ITS NATURE AND LAMENTABLE EFFECTS. ALSO A RE-PUBLICATION OF THE SENTIMENTS OF SEVERAL AUTHORS OF NOTE, ON THIS INTERESTING SUBJECT; PARTICULARLY AN EXTRACT OF A TREATISE, BY GRANVILLE SHARP. Anthony Benezet.
SOME HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF GUINEA, ITS SITUATION, PRODUCE AND THE GENERAL DISPOSITION OF ITS INHABITANTS. WITH AN INQUIRY INTO THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF THE SLAVE TRADE, ITS NATURE AND LAMENTABLE EFFECTS. ALSO A RE-PUBLICATION OF THE SENTIMENTS OF SEVERAL AUTHORS OF NOTE, ON THIS INTERESTING SUBJECT; PARTICULARLY AN EXTRACT OF A TREATISE, BY GRANVILLE SHARP.
SOME HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF GUINEA, ITS SITUATION, PRODUCE AND THE GENERAL DISPOSITION OF ITS INHABITANTS. WITH AN INQUIRY INTO THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF THE SLAVE TRADE, ITS NATURE AND LAMENTABLE EFFECTS. ALSO A RE-PUBLICATION OF THE SENTIMENTS OF SEVERAL AUTHORS OF NOTE, ON THIS INTERESTING SUBJECT; PARTICULARLY AN EXTRACT OF A TREATISE, BY GRANVILLE SHARP.

SOME HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF GUINEA, ITS SITUATION, PRODUCE AND THE GENERAL DISPOSITION OF ITS INHABITANTS. WITH AN INQUIRY INTO THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF THE SLAVE TRADE, ITS NATURE AND LAMENTABLE EFFECTS. ALSO A RE-PUBLICATION OF THE SENTIMENTS OF SEVERAL AUTHORS OF NOTE, ON THIS INTERESTING SUBJECT; PARTICULARLY AN EXTRACT OF A TREATISE, BY GRANVILLE SHARP.

Philadelphia: Joseph Crukshank, 1771. [bound with] Sharp, Granville: EXTRACT FROM A REPRESENTATION OF THE INJUSTICE AND DANGEROUS TENDENCY OF TOLERATING SLAVERY, OR ADMITTING THE LEAST CLAIM OF PRIVATE PROPERTY IN THE PERSONS OF MEN IN ENGLAND. Philadelphia: Crukshank. 1771.
[bound with] EXTRACT FROM AN ADDRESS IN THE VIRGINIA GAZETTE, OF MARCH 19. 1767. MR. RIND, PERMIT ME, IN YOUR PAPER, TO ADDRESS THE MEMBERS OF OUR ASSEMBLY ON TWO POINTS... [np, nd].

The three titles bound together, as issued, in contemporary full sheep with raised spine bands [some rubbing, but hinges firm]. [6], iv, 144, 53, [6] pp [as issued]. Separate title page for the Sharp item after page 144; caption title for the EXTRACT after page 44, second count. Light foxing and toning, Very Good.
This is the first edition of Benezet's landmark study of Guinea and the slave trade; and the first American edition of Sharp's 'Extract'. The second 'Extract' has been attributed to Arthur Lee, a member of Virginia's elite First Family. He argues, "Long and serious reflections upon the nature and consequences of slavery have convinced me, that it is a violation both of justice and religion; that it is dangerous to the safety of the community in which it prevails; that it is destructive to the growth of arts and sciences; and lastly, that it produces a numerous and very fatal train of vices, both in the slave, and in his master."
Like Lee and Sharp, Benezet espouses the Natural Rights of mankind. "Freedom is unquestionably the birth-right of all mankind, Africans as well as Europeans." Benezet's work "gave to Thomas Clarkson his first facts on the slave trade, and was the source of the impulse to begin his long and active protest against it" [DAB]. Benezet's preface explains his purpose: "Some account will be here given of the different parts of Africa, from which the Negroes are brought to America; with an impartial relation from what motives the Europeans were first induced to undertake, and have since continued this iniquitous traffic." Those motives "were concerned in reaping the gain of this infamous traffic." Sabin notes four reprintings during the 1770's and 1780's.
FIRST EDITION. Evans 11985. Hildeburn 2633. Sabin 4689. Work 257. Blockson 10074. Item #37974

Price: $2,500.00