THE CONDUCT OF THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT TOWARDS THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND IN THE WEST INDIA COLONIES: IN A LETTER TO VISCOUNT GODERICH, SECRETARY OF STATE FOR THE COLONIAL DEPARTMENT. BY VINDEX.

London: James Ridgway, 169, Piccadilly [verso of half title: Henry Baylis, Johnson's-Court, Fleet-Street, 1831. 24pp, with the half title, as issued. Mild occasional foxing, Very Good. Bound in modern marbled paper over boards.

Vindex, whoever he is, is angry with the British government for parroting the "silly, sounding, worn-out falsehood" that "Christianity and Slavery were incompatible," and similar "puerilities." Under the Hebrews and early Christians, Slavery "was no by-practice, no secret vice, no hole-and-corner immorality; it was common as day-light, wide as the earth itself, met you in streets ... and knelt down to worship by your side in the temple of God himself." Yet England treats the Planters like "felon outlaws" and empowers the missionaries to stir up resentment and rebellion among the slaves.
This scarce pamphlet, says Ragatz, is "A violent tirade against the British ministry for guaranteeing the sectarians liberty of action and protection in the Caribbean area. West India Committee records show that this pamphlet was sponsored by the planter group of London, 1,500 copies having been ordered printed on February 26, 1831, and 50 [pounds] being voted the unknown author for his services."
Ragatz 362. Sabin 99773. OCLC 458601701 [1- Biblioteque Nacionale], 1181066406 [1- Nat. Lib. Scotland], 79965252 [1- JCB] as of April 2022. The British Library also owns a copy. Item #38298

Price: $750.00