THE CHARACTER AND OVERTHROW OF LAISH CONSIDERED AND APPLIED. A SERMON PREACHED AT THE DESIRE OF THE HONOURABLE ARTILLERY-COMPANY IN BOSTON, JUNE 3, 1734. BEING THE ANNIVERSARY DAY FOR THEIR ELECTION OF OFFICERS.

Boston: Printed by S. Kneeland & T. Green, for D. Henchman in Cornhill, 1734. [4], 19, [1 blank] pp, as issued. With the half title ["Mr. Chauncy's Artillery-Election Sermon, June 3. 1734"]. Stitched, untrimmed. Moderately spotted, Good+. With the contemporary ownership signature of James Cushing, probably the New England Congregational minister.

This is the prolific Chauncy's third published sermon during a long and eventful career. He explains that a martial spirit is compatible with, and indeed necessary to, a religious sensibility. Chauncy [1705-1787] "was undoubtedly the most influential clergyman of his time in Boston, and, with the exception of Jonathan Edwards, in all New England" [DAB]. A passionate American patriot, he was a friend of the American Revolution and foe of the Church of England's establishment in America. For years he criticized Great Britain for its treatment of the American colonies, expressing a sophisticated understanding of the nature of government and the natural rights of mankind.
Chauncy draws his lesson from the "Careless, Quiet and Secure" people of Laish, who "were shamelessly negligent of their own safety." Foolishly, they "did not perplex their minds with concern about their enemies; had no sense of danger; were tho'tless of a surprise, and without expectation of any sudden assault." Asserting that the neglect of martial training is an affront to God, Chauncy urges "that military skill and valour, together with sobriety and a due decorum, will be promoted among our souldiers... Never let us desert our post, or fly from our colours."
Evans 3758. ESTC W37716. Item #38326

Price: $1,500.00

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