MANUSCRIPT PETITION TO VIRGINIA LEGISLATOR JOHN W. LUKE FROM UNKNOWN AUTHOR[S], UNDATED BUT DECEMBER 1850 OR JANUARY 1851, RECOMMENDING LAWYER AND CONGRESSMAN RICHARD PARKER FOR JUDGE OF THE 13TH CIRCUIT COURT, THE SEAT FROM WHICH PARKER WOULD SENTENCE JOHN BROWN TO DEATH IN 1859.

Single page ink manuscript, addressed to Luke on verso with wax seal remnant. Folded for mailing, Very Good.

Circuit Judge I.R. Douglas died in December 1850. This Letter petition, undated and unsigned, urges the appointment of Richard Parker as his successor.
"The undersigned, a portion of your constituents, take the liberty of addressing you on the subject of the appointment of a successor to the late lamented judge of the 13th circuit. We all agree that the office should be filled by the man of sound head & heart; that to a sound & discriminating mind, solid legal acquirements, should be united honesty & integrity. It is our opinion that the Honbl. Richd. Parker, possesses all those requisites & that he is the man, of those spoken of for the office, & who will be likely to get the appointment, who would be most acceptable to the people, & who would fill the office worthily & satisfactorily. We therefore request you to use your best efforts, to have him appointed to fill the vacant office. Very Respy Your humble & Obt Srvts."
Parker (1810-1893), born in Richmond, was a judge, lawyer, and Congressman best known for presiding over the trial of abolitionist John Brown. Parker represented Virginia's 10th District as a Democrat in the House of Representatives from 1849 until his appointment in January 1851 as Judge of the Circuit Court. He represented the State of Virginia in the 1866 Philadelphia Peace Convention. ["Death of Judge Richard Parker," Alexandria Gazette, November 11, 1893, page 2.] John W. Luke [1815-1896] was a prominent citizen in the Circuit and served in the Virginia State Legislature. Item #38665

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