STRICTURES ON A PAMPHLET, ENTITLED A "FRIENDLY ADDRESS TO ALL REASONABLE AMERICANS, ON THE SUBJECT OF OUR POLITICAL CONFUSIONS." ADDRESSED TO THE PEOPLE OF AMERICA.

America: Boston: Re-Printed and Sold at Greenleaf's Printing-Office... 1775. 20pp. Untrimmed, margin-foxed, with some light text foxing. Else Very Good, in modern cloth [which is lightly worn].

The Friendly Address had supported the Intolerable Acts, warned against a bloody and futile colonial rebellion, argued that the colonists were unreasonable, and insisted that English policies were just and sensible. Of the numerous responses to the 'Friendly Address,' "probably none was more talked about and laughed over, and none was more effective, than" this "sprightly brochure," which was immediately "attributed to General Charles Lee, for it has all the notes of that brilliant and Mephistophelian personage-- eccentricity, fluentness, smartness, tartness, a mocking tone, a cosmopolitan air, unusual information, an easy assumption of authority on all subjects-- particularly on those appertaining to military history and to military criticism." Tyler, Literary History of the American Revolution 395 [1897]. Its first edition issued in 1774 from Philadelphia. This is one of five 1775 printings.
Lee surmises that the author of the Friendly Address [probably Thomas Bradbury Chandler] must be an Anglican, for the Address "has the want of candour and truth, the apparent spirit of persecution, the unforgivingness, the deadly hatred to Dissenters, and the zeal for arbitrary power, which has distinguished Churchmen in all ages, and more particularly the high part of the Church of England." The High Church clergyman Chandler favored establishing the Church of England in the Colonies, and opposed American independence.
Howes L193. Adams, American Independence 125b. Evans 14151. Item #38671

Price: $3,500.00

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