THE LATE GENERAL DUNCAN, C.S.A. THE FOLLOWING DOCUMENTS AND EDITORIAL NOTICES ARE SELECTED FROM A NUMBER OF SIMILAR PUBLICATIONS AT THE TIME OF THE DEATH OF THE ILLUSTRIOUS DECEASED.

[np: 1862]. Folio broadside, 8" x 20." Printed in two columns separated by a double rule. Generously margined, with chip at blank lower right margin. Old horizontal folds expertly strengthened. Good+.

A Pennsylvanian and West Point graduate, Duncan resigned from the Army in 1855 to live and work in New Orleans. "By 1861 he considered himself a Louisianian and sided with the South when the Civil War began. His first assignment was as a Colonel of Artillery defending Forts Jackson and St. Philip below New Orleans. He was commissioned a Brigadier General on January 7, 1862, and had about 500 men and 80 guns at his disposal when Union Captain David G. Farragut brought up his fleet and mortar boats to attack the forts. On the first day of firing, April 18, 1862, Farragut's mortars lobbed close to 3000 rounds at Fort Jackson in a 10-hour bombardment. He and his men held out until April 24. On that day Farragut successfully ran with his fleet past the fort's guns, landing infantry behind the fort. He surrendered on April 28, and was taken prisoner. After being exchanged on August 27, 1862, he was given charge of an infantry brigade during the operations in Kentucky. He briefly commanded a division, and then became General Braxton Bragg's staff chief in Tennessee but died of typhoid fever in Knoxville" [Find a Grave Memorial on line].
This rare broadside consists of tributes from military and civilian authorities. The New Orleans City Council, "with feelings of unbounded admiration and respect," lauds his defence of New Orleans. The Picayune praises "the gallant Duncan." A long biographical tribute is printed in the Richmond Enquirer.
Not located in Parrish & Willingham, Crandall, Hummel, or on OCLC or online sites of AAS, Library of Congress, Library Company, Tulane, LSU. Item #39288

Price: $3,500.00