Item #39673 THE FOX WITHOUT A TAIL. A CUNNING FOX HAVING LOST HIS TAIL IN A TRAP TO SAVE HIMSELF FROM RIDICULE CALLED A CONVENTION OF THE OTHER FOXES AND STATED TO THEM THAT HAVEING [sic] FOUND HIS TAIL A GREAT INCUMBRANCE HE HAD CUT IT OFF, AND ADVISED THEM ALL TO DO THE SAME, THE RESULT IS SEEN ABOVE. John L. Magee.

THE FOX WITHOUT A TAIL. A CUNNING FOX HAVING LOST HIS TAIL IN A TRAP TO SAVE HIMSELF FROM RIDICULE CALLED A CONVENTION OF THE OTHER FOXES AND STATED TO THEM THAT HAVEING [sic] FOUND HIS TAIL A GREAT INCUMBRANCE HE HAD CUT IT OFF, AND ADVISED THEM ALL TO DO THE SAME, THE RESULT IS SEEN ABOVE

Philadelphia: Published by J.L. Magee, 22 South Fifth St. [1861]. Lithograph, image oblong 10-1/4" x 14." Elaborately illustrated, cartoon statements by the politicians. Very Good.

Reilly explains, "A satire on South Carolina's role as instigator of secessionism in the South. The artist may be lampooning the convention of seceded states which assembled at Montgomery, Alabama, on February 4, 1861. The prominent leaders of the Confederate states are portrayed as foxes. The chief fox [the one 'without a tail'] is South Carolina governor Francis Pickens. . . Here he tries to entice the others into giving up their tails as well."
Pickens stands "on a pedestal supported on the back of a crouching black man, Pickens holds aloft a document 'Secession'." Jefferson Davis, holding a large ax, is present, along with the foxes 'Florida,' 'Texas,' and other seceded states. Toombs, Jacob Thompson, and representations of other players are also present.
From Cornell's description: "By the time Lincoln took office in April of 1861, seven states had already seceded from the Union in protest. This secession cartoon depicts the elected representatives of those seven Confederate states, and compares their situation to Aesop's fable 'The Fox Without a Tail.' In that fable, a cunning fox, having lost his tail in a trap, seeks to save himself from ridicule by convincing his fellow foxes to follow suit by cutting off their tails, claiming that he had found his own to be a great encumbrance."
Reilly 1861-8. Weitenkampf 126. OCLC 299946682 [1- DLC], 1136529847 [1- AAS], as of November 2023. Cornell also has a copy. Item #39673

Price: $2,000.00