Item #39837 REPORT OF THE TRIAL OF CASTNER HANWAY FOR TREASON, IN THE RESISTANCE OF THE EXECUTION OF THE FUGITIVE SLAVE LAW OF SEPTEMBER, 1850. BEFORE JUDGES GRIER AND KANE, IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNITED STATES, FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA. HELD AT PHILADELPHIA IN NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER, 1851. TO WHICH IS ADDED AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES ON THE SUBJECT OF FUGITIVES FROM LABOR, THE CHARGES OF JUDGE KANE TO THE GRAND JURIES IN RELATION THERETO, AND A STATEMENT OF THE POINTS OF LAW DECIDED BY THE COURT DURING THE TRIAL. BY JAMES J. ROBBINS, OF THE PHILADELPHIA BAR. FROM THE NOTES OF ARTHUR CANNON AND SAMUEL B. DALRYMPLE, PHONOGRAPHIC REPORTERS APPOINTED BY THE COURT FOR THIS CASE. James J. Robbins.

REPORT OF THE TRIAL OF CASTNER HANWAY FOR TREASON, IN THE RESISTANCE OF THE EXECUTION OF THE FUGITIVE SLAVE LAW OF SEPTEMBER, 1850. BEFORE JUDGES GRIER AND KANE, IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNITED STATES, FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA. HELD AT PHILADELPHIA IN NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER, 1851. TO WHICH IS ADDED AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES ON THE SUBJECT OF FUGITIVES FROM LABOR, THE CHARGES OF JUDGE KANE TO THE GRAND JURIES IN RELATION THERETO, AND A STATEMENT OF THE POINTS OF LAW DECIDED BY THE COURT DURING THE TRIAL. BY JAMES J. ROBBINS, OF THE PHILADELPHIA BAR. FROM THE NOTES OF ARTHUR CANNON AND SAMUEL B. DALRYMPLE, PHONOGRAPHIC REPORTERS APPOINTED BY THE COURT FOR THIS CASE.

Philadelphia: King & Baird, No. 9 Sansom Street, 1852. 275, [1 blank] pp. Rubberstamp and blindstamp on title page. Bound in later institutional cloth, first gathering loosening. Good+.

This complete transcript of the trial commences with jury selection, Hanway's arraignment, and opening arguments. It "contains as complete a record as possible of any trial in the nineteenth century. Besides providing legal arguments it contains the testimony, examinations and cross-examinations, discussions between bar and bench, and even the sarcastic and angry banter that is inevitable in a trial as highly charged as this one was" [Finkelman].
Hanway was the first to be tried of 41 men indicted for treason at Christiana, Pennsylvania, in resisting the recovery by the Marylander Edward Gorsuch [who arrived fortified by a warrant, friends, and arms] of his runaway slave. Some of the slave's friends, also black, arrived at the scene, ready to fight, along with Hanway and another white man. "When Deputy Marshal Kline tried to deputize these two men, they refused and instead urged the outnumbered Gorsuch party to leave. This warning was ignored, and a skirmish soon ensued. When it was over Gorsuch was dead, his son was severely wounded, and other members of the party had either been hurt or fled the area. The Christiana riot was the most violent episode in the struggle against the Fugitive Slave Act. Hanway had taken no positive action against Gorsuch and his party. But he had refused to either join the posse or try to prevent the blacks from attacking the slave catchers...On the last day of the trial, Justice Grier charged the jury that the act of refusing to aid in the rendition of a fugitive slave did not constitute treason. It took the jury just fifteen minutes to find Hanway innocent. Ultimately the other forty indictments were dropped" [Finkelman].
Edward Gorsuch (1795-1851) and his son, Dickinson III (1826-1882), are distant relatives of United States Supreme Court Judge Neil McGill Gorsuch. Each is a descendant of Maryland's Charles Gorsuch (1642-1716): Edward and Dickinson are from the line of Charles' son Thomas B. Gorsuch (1680-1774); Justice Gorsuch is from the line of Charles' son Charles Gorsuch (1687-1747).
Finkelman 98-99. Cohen 14181. LCP 4564. Sabin 71820. Item #39837

Price: $1,000.00

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